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Deserts 101 | National Geographic

Deserts 101 | National Geographic

– [Narrator] Wind whips over a barren wasteland. Vast nothingness as far as the eye can see, or so it may seem. Creatures peek out of burrows, scurry across the sand, and soar through the sky, revealing a landscape not as lifeless as it might first appear. Deserts are often defined as areas of land …

Sharks 101 | National Geographic

Sharks 101 | National Geographic

(ominous music) – [Narrator] They glide through the water with unmistakable grace, remnants of an ancient past, they dive and they rise from the ocean’s murky depths to it’s sun-kissed shallows, rousing fear and awe like no other creature in the sea. The world’s biggest living fish is a shark. Of the estimated 34,000 species …

Black Holes 101 | National Geographic

Black Holes 101 | National Geographic

(mysterious music) – [Woman] Black holes are among the most fascinating objects in our universe, and also the most mysterious. A black hole is a region in space where the force of gravity is so strong, not even light, the fastest known entity in our universe, can escape. The boundary of a black hole is …

Lungs 101 | National Geographic

– [Narrator] Breathe in, breathe out. With every breath, the body is replenished and cleansed. A process made possible by two of the body’s most important and delicate organs. The lungs are two major components of the respiratory system. Soft, light, and elastic, these organs are prime for taking in and filling up with air. …

Wildfires 101 | National Geographic

Wildfires 101 | National Geographic

– [Narrator] On average, wildfires burn up to five million acres of land in the United States each year. While they can start naturally, wildfires are often caused by humans with devastating consequences. Wildfires are large, uncontrolled infernos that burn and quickly spread through wild landscapes. Types of wildfires may include forest, brush, and peatland …

Cancer 101 | National Geographic

Cancer 101 | National Geographic

– [Narrator] Today cancer causes one in every seven deaths worldwide. But how does cancer start, and what is being done to combat it? Our bodies contain trillions of highly specialized cells and each carries genes responsible for regulating cell growth and division. But when a genetic change disrupts this process cells begin to grow …

Coral Reefs 101 | National Geographic

Coral Reefs 101 | National Geographic

(gentle music) – [Narrator] Coral reefs, their bright, vivid colors can be seen in tropical ocean waters around the globe. Beyond their brilliant appearance lies a hidden significance. Coral are animals. Though they may look like colorful plants, coral are, in fact, made up of tiny animals called polyps. These invertebrates can range from the …

Ancient Rome 101 | National Geographic

Ancient Rome 101 | National Geographic

– [Narrator] The story of ancient Rome is a story of evolution, of how a civilization’s ability to adapt and dominate can lead to its survival for over 1,000 years. Rome began as a small village on central Italy’s Tiber River. In the coming centuries, it grew into an empire that stretched from the north …

Uranus 101 | National Geographic

Uranus 101 | National Geographic

– [Angeli] In ancient times, humans studied the night sky and discovered the worlds of Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. But beyond this realm of knowledge, another world shined brightly, just waiting to be discovered. Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun from a distance of about 20 astronomical units, or 20 times …

Neanderthals 101 | National Geographic

Neanderthals 101 | National Geographic

– [Narrator] Neanderthals are often depicted as brutish cave men, but science shows that our early ancestors were actually quite advanced. Neanderthals, or homo neanderthalensis, are our closest relatives in the human family tree. The species lived from about 400,000 to 40,000 years ago and inhabited an area that stretched as far was as Europe’s …