Constantine Prefigured in the Old Testament


According to Wikipedia, Typology in Christian
theology and biblical exegesis is a doctrine or theory concerning the relationship of the
Old Testament to the New Testament. Typology is very useful for grasping truths
about the Catholic Faith, because it is both at the same time simple and profound. Through typology, people, place and events
from the Old Testament are seen as a foreshadowing or a pre-figurement of people, places and
events in the New Testament. Typology uses storytelling to deepen our understanding
about the Catholic Faith. This is much like the approach that Our Lord
took to explaining Truth, as He spoke in parables and stories so that everyone could understand. Please listen prayerfully and open your hearts
to see the typological pre-figurements that lie waiting for us in the Old Testament. Before we examine how Constantine was prefigured
in the Old Testament by Moses, I would like to offer an idea.. The Old Testament contains the entire
history of the Israelites. The Israelites were the Old Testament people
of God. Their entire history, from their inception
until their ending is completely contained in the Books of the Old
Testament. Similarly,
the New Testament is the entire history of the new people of God,
the Catholic Church. The New Testament really contains our entire
history from start to finish. However, the difference is that for the
Israelites, their history is entirely recorded in the Bible. Our history
is still being lived out. We are still in the New Testament, even though
our history is not recorded entirely in the Bible. With that concept in mind, it becomes clear
why Constantine would be prefigured in the pages of the Old
Testament. If
the Old prefigures the New, then events in the history of the Church
would be prefigured by the Old Testament. It’s not just people, places and events from
the pages of the Books of the New Testament, but the actual
history of Our Church that comprises the actual New Testament. Now, we are ready to look at how Constantine
is prefigured in the Old Testament by the life and events surrounding Moses. The story of Moses stretches through the the
last 4 books of the Pentateuch in the Old Testament. The birth of Moses occurs in the second chapter
of the Book of Exodus. The story of his
life continues through the books of Numbers, Leviticus and finally, his death is recorded
in the Book of Deuteronomy, chapter 34 verse 5. Because of the vast amount of Scripture
concerning Moses, it would be to lengthy to go over all of them in this video. For that reason,
just the scriptures that are relevant to the prefigurment of Constantine will be examined. Moses is, perhaps, most well known for setting
the Israelites free from their bondage in Egypt
Moses was sent down the Nile River by his mother to protect him from murder. Moses
was taken in by Pharaoh’s daughter and raised as a Prince of Egypt, even though his mother
was an Israelite. After this there went a man of the house of
Levi; and took a wife of his own kindred. And she conceived, and bore a son; and seeing
him a goodly child hid him three months. And when she could hide him no longer, she
took a basket made of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and pitch: and put the little
babe therein, and laid him in the sedges by the river’s
brink, His sister standing afar off, and taking notice
what would be done. And behold the daughter of Pharao came down
to wash herself in the river: and her maids walked by the river’s brink. And when she saw the basket in the sedges,
she sent one of her maids for it: and when it was brought,
She opened it and seeing within it an infant crying, having compassion on it she said:
This is one of the babes of the Hebrews. And the child’s sister said to her Shall I
go and call to thee a Hebrew woman, to nurse the babe? She answered: Go. The maid went and called her mother. And Pharao’s daughter said to her. Take this child and nurse him for me: I will
give thee thy wages. The woman took, and nursed the child: and
when he was grown up, she delivered him to Pharao’s daughter.  And she adopted him for a son, and called
him Moses, saying: Because I took him out of the water. While part of the royal house of Pharaoh,
Moses kills and Egyptian guard who was abusing an Israelite slave. Moses runs away because Pharaoh is seeking
to kill him. Moses goes
far away, to the land of Midian where he marries a Midianite woman. It is in his
time in exile that God speaks to Moses and gives him his mission and authority. However, even though Moses is called by God,
he still puts off circumcising his son. He was supposed to teach God’s law, but was
not following it himself The passage in Scripture that describes this
is difficult, and could also mean that Moses wasn’t circumcised himself. There are credible arguments that support
both interpretations. In those days after Moses was grown up, he
went out to his brethren: and saw their affliction, and an Egyptian striking one of the Hebrews
his brethren. And when he had looked about this way and
that way, and saw no one there, he slew the Egyptian and hid him in
the sand. And Pharao heard of this word and sought to
kill Moses: but he fled from his sight, and abode in the land of Madian, and he sat down
by a well. And Moses swore that he would dwell with him. And he took Sephora his daughter to wife:
Now Moses fed the sheep of Jethro his father in law, the priest of Madian: and he drove
the flock to the inner parts of the desert, and came to the mountain of God, Horeb. And the Lord appeared to him in a flame of
fire out of the midst of a bush And when he was in his journey, in the inn,
the Lord met him, and would have killed him. Immediately Sephora took a very sharp stone,
and circumcised the fore skin of her son, and touched his feet and said: A bloody spouse
art thou to me. Moses returns to Egypt to free the Israelites
from bondage. After a series of plagues, God instructs Moses
to have the Israelites paint their doorposts with lamb’s blood. This will mark the doors of the believers,
and through it, they will be set free and conquer
their enemies. Soon after, the Israelites are set free, but
are then pursued by Pharaoh. Pharaoh ends up drowning in the Red Sea
along with his whole army. With the death of Pharaoh and his army, the
threat is over for Israel. The Israelites start their journey through
the desert to the Promised Land. However, Moses does not make it to the Promised
Land and dies right before he gets there. And they shall take of the blood thereof,
and put it upon both the side posts, and on the upper
door posts of the houses, wherein they shall eat it. Pharao’s chariots and his army he hath cast
into the sea: his chosen captains are drowned in the Red Sea. The depths have covered them, they are sunk
to the bottom like a stone. And the Lord said to him: This is the land,
for which I swore to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, saying:
I will give it to thy seed. Thou hast seen it with thy eyes, and shalt
not pass over to it. And Moses the servant of the Lord died there,
in the land of Moab, by the commandment of the Lord: Now that we have accounted for certain events
in the life of Moses, we can move onto the life of
Constantine, a complex and somewhat controversial Emperor of Rome who legalized Christianity. Constantine was Emperor of Rome from 306 to
337 AD. It was Constantine who legalized Christianity
and delivered the Christians from the threat of Persecution, after just having suffered
through the great persecutions of Emperor Decius and Diocletian. During this time in Roman history, there were
two Emperors, as Diocletian had split the Empire
in two to better manage it’s vast area. Constantine, at one time, was one of two reigning
Emperors. Constantine’s mother was St. Helena,
a devout and holy Catholic. Constantine was the first emperor to stop
Christian persecutions and to legalise Christianity along with all other religions and cults in
the Roman Empire. Constantine was the son of Flavius Valerius
Constantius, a Roman army officer, and his consort Helena. The term tetrarchy describes any form of government
where power is divided among four individuals, but in modern usage usually refers to the
system instituted by Roman Emperor Diocletian in 293, marking the end of the Crisis of the
Third Century and the recovery of the Roman Empire. According to Wikipedia, Typology in Christian
theology and biblical exegesis is a doctrine or theory concerning the relationship of the
Old Testament to the New Testament. Typology is very useful for grasping truths
about the Catholic Faith, because it is both at the same time simple and profound. Through
typology, people, place and events from the Old Testament are seen as a foreshadowing
or a pre-figurement of people, places and events in the New Testament. Typology uses
storytelling to deepen our understanding about the Catholic Faith. This is much like the
approach that Our Lord took to explaining Truth, as He spoke in parables and stories
so that everyone could understand. Please listen prayerfully and open your hearts to
see the typological pre-figurements that lie waiting for us in the Old Testament.
Before we examine how Constantine was prefigured in the Old Testament by Moses, I would like
to offer an idea.. The Old Testament contains the entire
history of the Israelites. The Israelites were the Old Testament people of
God. Their entire history, from their inception until their ending is
completely contained in the Books of the Old Testament. Similarly,
the New Testament is the entire history of the new people of God,
the Catholic Church. The New Testament really contains our entire
history from start to finish. However, the difference is that for the
Israelites, their history is entirely recorded in the Bible. Our history
is still being lived out. We are still in the New Testament, even though
our history is not recorded entirely in the Bible. With that concept in mind, it becomes clear
why Constantine would be prefigured in the pages of the Old
Testament. If the Old prefigures the New, then events in
the history of the Church would be prefigured by the Old Testament. It’s not just people, places and events from
the pages of the Books of the New Testament, but the actual
history of Our Church that comprises the actual New Testament. Now, we are ready to look at how Constantine
is prefigured in the Old Testament by the life and events surrounding Moses. The story of Moses stretches through the the
last 4 books of the Pentateuch in the Old Testament.
The birth of Moses occurs in the second chapter of the Book of Exodus. The story of his
life continues through the books of Numbers, Leviticus and finally, his death is recorded
in the Book of Deuteronomy, chapter 34 verse 5. Because of the vast amount of Scripture
concerning Moses, it would be to lengthy to go over all of them in this video. For that
reason, just the scriptures that are relevant to the
prefigurment of Constantine will be examined. Moses is, perhaps, most well known for setting
the Israelites free from their bondage in Egypt
Moses was sent down the Nile River by his mother to protect him from murder. Moses
was taken in by Pharaoh’s daughter and raised as a Prince of Egypt, even though his mother
was an Israelite. After this there went a man of the house of
Levi; and took a wife of his own kindred. And she conceived, and bore a son; and seeing
him a goodly child hid him three months. And when she could hide him no longer, she
took a basket made of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and pitch: and put the little
babe therein, and laid him in the sedges by the river’s
brink, His sister standing afar off, and taking notice
what would be done. And behold the daughter of Pharao came down
to wash herself in the river: and her maids walked by the river’s brink. And when she
saw the basket in the sedges, she sent one of her maids for it: and when
it was brought, She opened it and seeing within it an infant
crying, having compassion on it she said: This is one of the babes of the Hebrews.
And the child’s sister said to her Shall I go and call to thee a Hebrew woman, to nurse
the babe? She answered: Go. The maid went and called
her mother. And Pharao’s daughter said to her. Take this
child and nurse him for me: I will give thee thy wages. The woman took, and nursed the
child: and when he was grown up, she delivered him to Pharao’s daughter.
 And she adopted him for a son, and called him Moses, saying: Because I took him out
of the water. While part of the royal house of Pharaoh,
Moses kills and Egyptian guard who was abusing an Israelite slave. Moses runs away because
Pharaoh is seeking to kill him. Moses goes far away, to the land of Midian where he marries
a Midianite woman. It is in his time in exile that God speaks to Moses and
gives him his mission and authority. However, even though Moses is called by God,
he still puts off circumcising his son. He was supposed to teach God’s law, but
was not following it himself The passage in Scripture that describes this
is difficult, and could also mean that Moses wasn’t circumcised himself.
There are credible arguments that support both interpretations.
In those days after Moses was grown up, he went out to his brethren: and saw their affliction,
and an Egyptian striking one of the Hebrews his brethren.
And when he had looked about this way and that way, and saw no one there, he slew the
Egyptian and hid him in the sand. And Pharao heard of this word and sought to
kill Moses: but he fled from his sight, and abode in the land of Madian, and he sat down
by a well. And Moses swore that he would dwell with him.
And he took Sephora his daughter to wife: Now Moses fed the sheep of Jethro his father
in law, the priest of Madian: and he drove the flock to the inner parts of the desert,
and came to the mountain of God, Horeb. And the Lord appeared to him in a flame of
fire out of the midst of a bush And when he was in his journey, in the inn,
the Lord met him, and would have killed him. Immediately Sephora took a very sharp stone,
and circumcised the fore skin of her son, and touched his feet and said: A bloody spouse
art thou to me. Moses returns to Egypt to free the Israelites
from bondage. After a series of plagues, God instructs Moses to have the Israelites
paint their doorposts with lamb’s blood. This will mark the doors of the believers, and
through it, they will be set free and conquer their enemies. Soon after, the Israelites
are set free, but are then pursued by Pharaoh. Pharaoh ends up drowning in the Red Sea
along with his whole army. With the death of Pharaoh and his army, the threat is over
for Israel. The Israelites start their journey through
the desert to the Promised Land. However, Moses does not make it to the Promised
Land and dies right before he gets there. And they shall take of the blood thereof,
and put it upon both the side posts, and on the upper
door posts of the houses, wherein they shall eat it.
Pharao’s chariots and his army he hath cast into the sea: his chosen captains are drowned
in the Red Sea. The depths have covered them, they are sunk
to the bottom like a stone. And the Lord said to him: This is the land,
for which I swore to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, saying:
I will give it to thy seed. Thou hast seen it with thy eyes, and shalt not pass over
to it. And Moses the servant of the Lord died there,
in the land of Moab, by the commandment of the Lord: Now that we have accounted for certain events
in the life of Moses, we can move onto the life of
Constantine, a complex and somewhat controversial Emperor of Rome who legalized Christianity. Constantine was Emperor of Rome from 306 to
337 AD. It was Constantine who legalized Christianity and delivered the Christians from the threat
of Persecution, after just having suffered through the
great persecutions of Emperor Decius and Diocletian. During this time in Roman history, there were
two Emperors, as Diocletian had split the Empire
in two to better manage it’s vast area. Constantine, at one time, was one of two reigning
Emperors. Constantine’s mother was St. Helena, a devout and holy Catholic.
Constantine was the first emperor to stop Christian persecutions and to legalise Christianity
along with all other religions and cults in the Roman Empire.
Constantine was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman army officer, and his
consort Helena. The term tetrarchy describes any form of government
where power is divided among four individuals, but in modern usage usually refers to the
system instituted by Roman Emperor Diocletian in 293, marking the end of the Crisis of the
Third Century and the recovery of the Roman Empire. This tetrarchy lasted
until c. 313, when internecine conflict eliminated most of the claimants to power, leaving Constantine
in control of the western half of the empire, and Licinius in
control of the eastern half. Constantine was raised in the court of Diocletian,
and became a tribune of the first order in that court.
Constantine was a member of that Court when Diocletian issued his great edit of persecution
of Christians. Soon, Diocletian resigned and the title of
Emperor passed to Galerius. Galerius made attempts on Constantine’s life, on several
occasions. For his safety, Constantine fled from the court of
Galerius at night, and ran far away to England. It was in England that he was to be raised
to power after the death of his father.
Constantine received a formal education at Diocletian’s court
Constantine was nonetheless a prominent member of the court
By late 305 AD, he had become a tribune of the first order, a tribunus ordinis primi
Constantine had returned to Nicomedia from the eastern front by the spring of 303 AD,
in time to witness the beginnings of Diocletian’s “Great Persecution”,
the most severe persecution of Christians in Roman history.
On 1 May 305 AD, Diocletian, as a result of a debilitating sickness taken in the winter
of 304–305 AD, announced his resignation. Constantius and Galerius were promoted to
Augusti, Some of the ancient sources detail plots that
Galerius made on Constantine’s life in the months following Diocletian’s abdication.
Constantine recognized the implicit danger in remaining at Galerius’s court, where he
was held as a virtual hostage. His career depended on being rescued by his father
in the west. Constantius was quick to intervene. In the late spring or early summer of 305 AD,
Constantius requested leave for his son to help him campaign in
Britain. After a long evening of drinking, Galerius granted the request. Constantine’s
later propaganda describes how he fled the court in the night, before Galerius
could change his mind. He rode from post-house to post-house at high speed, hamstringing
every horse in his wake. By the time Galerius awoke the following
morning, Constantine had fled too far to be caught. Constantine joined his father in Gaul,
at Bononia (Boulogne) before the summer of 305 AD. From Bononia they crossed the Channel to Britain
and made their way to Eboracum (York), capital of the province of Britannia Secunda and home
to a large military base. Constantine was able
to spend a year in northern Britain Before dying, he declared his support for
raising Constantine to the rank of full Augustus. The Alamannic king Chrocus, a barbarian taken
into service under Constantius, then proclaimed Constantine as Augustus. The
troops loyal to Constantius’ memory followed him in acclamation. Gaul and Britain quickly
accepted his rule After Constantine is raised to be the Emperor
of the West, after the death of his Father, Constantine. A series of imperial
intrigues and power struggles ensued. Eventually, Constantine found himself at war with Maxentius,
who had gained control of power in Italy, and was headquartered
in the city of Rome. The night before the battle in which
Constantine would gain victory over Maxentius, he had a vision in the sky in which God told
Constantine he would conquer with a sign. The sign Constantine
saw was most likely a cross, or the Chi Rho (as see here).
Constantine marked the sign on the shields of his army. Even though he was greatly outnumbered,
Constantine defeated Maxentius at Milvian Bridge, over
the Tiber River, e in Rome. Maxentius and a large part of his army drowned in the Tiber
River One can imagine that the Tiber River turned
Red with Blood the day of that battle. Maxentius organized his forces—still twice
the size of Constantine’s—in long lines facing the battle plain, with their backs
to the river. Constantine’s army arrived at the field bearing unfamiliar symbols
on either its standards or its soldiers’ shields. According to Lactantius, Constantine was visited
by a dream the night before the battle, wherein he was advised
“to mark the heavenly sign of God on the shields of his soldiers … by means of a slanted
letter X with the top of its head bent round, he marked Christ on their
shields.” Eusebius describes another version, where, while marching at midday, “he saw with
his own eyes in the heavens a trophy of the cross arising from
the light of the sun, carrying the message, In Hoc Signo Vinces or “with this sign, you
will conquer”; in Eusebius’s account, Constantine had a dream the following
night, in which Christ appeared with the same heavenly sign, and told him to make a standard,
the labarum, for his army in that form. Constantine deployed his own forces along
the whole length of Maxentius’ line. He ordered his cavalry to charge, and they broke Maxentius’
cavalry. He then sent his infantry against Maxentius’ infantry, pushing
many into the Tiber where they were slaughtered and drowned. The battle was brief: Maxentius’
troops were broken before the first charge. Maxentius’
horse guards and praetorians initially held their position, but broke under the force
of a Constantinian cavalry charge; they also broke ranks and fled to the river.
Maxentius rode with them, and attempted to cross the bridge of boats, but he was pushed
by the mass of his fleeing soldiers into the Tiber, and drowned.
Even though Constantine is credited with ending the persecutions of Christians in the Empire,
he himself didn’t get baptized until right at the end of his life. A controversy
surrounds his baptism since he was not baptized by a Catholic bishop, but
instead by an Arian, heretical, bishop. Constantine was on the way to Persia on a military campaign.
He planned on stopping at the Jordan River were he planned on being
baptized, just as Our Lord was. However, before he got there, he became
very sick. He soon died, without making it to the Jordan River. He was baptized soon
before his death by an Arian Bishop. In the last years of his life Constantine
made plans for a campaign against Persia. Constantine planned to be baptized in the
Jordan River before crossing into Persia. Persian diplomats came to Constantinople over
the winter of 336–337, seeking peace, but Constantine turned them
away. The campaign was called off, however, when Constantine became sick in the spring
of 337. Constantine had known death would soon come.
Within the Church of the Holy Apostles, Constantine had secretly prepared a final resting-place
for himself. It came sooner than he had expected. Soon
after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople
for the hot baths near his mother’s city of Helenopolis, on the southern shores
of the Gulf of Nicomedia. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the
Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. Seeking purification, he
became a catechumen, and attempted a return to Constantinople,
making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of
his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to
have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian
life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius
records, “performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom”. He chose the Arianizing
bishop Eusebius of Nicomedia, bishop of the city where he lay dying, as his baptizer. Now that we have the stories of Moses from
the Old Testament, and also events in the life of Emperor Constantine in the New Testament,
we can see all the amazing parallels between the two.
It was Moses who, after a long slavery and oppression in Egypt, was to
deliver God’s chosen people, and start their journey towards to Promised Land. Constantine legalized Christianity, after
a long period of persecution at the hands of the Roman Empire. He set the Church
on a journey that would eventually end with the Church ruling over
the Roman Empire. Moses was raised in the house of Pharaoh,
and was a prince of Egypt. There was another prince of Egypt, Ramses, who would
become Pharaoh and rule over Egypt. Constantine lived in the brief period of the
Tetrarchy, when there were two Emperors of Rome. Constantine, and his rival
Maxentius, were both heirs to the Imperial thrones.
Moses’s mother was an Israelite and had a son who was Prince of Egypt.
She was a member and a believer in the Covenant that God made with
the nation of Israel. Constantine’s mother was St. Helena, and she
had a son who became Emperor of Rome. She was a member and a believer
in the Covenant that God made with the Catholic Church.
Moses ran away from Egypt to save his life, since Pharaoh
was seeking to kill him. It was while he was far away in Midian
that he was given his authority and his mission. Constantine ran away from the court of Galerius,
Emperor of Rome. Galerius had tried to kill him on several
occasions. Constantine went as far as Britain. It was there that he would
be made Emperor and given his authority.
Moses was born an Israelite, however, after his birth he was given
up by his Mother. It is possible that Moses himself wasn’t circumcised.
On his way to Egypt to free God’s people, God tried to kill Moses. Moses
definitely delayed the circumcision of his son, and perhaps also, himself.
Upon God trying to kill Moses, his wife acted quickly and circumcised her
son and perhaps also, Moses himself. Although Constantine legalized Christianity,
and also protected it to a certain degree, Constantine himself was
not a baptized Christian, and therefore was not part of the Church. He wasn’t
baptized until right before his death.
Moses was told by God to mark the doorposts of the Israelites houses
with lamb’s blood. Thus, the angel of death would descend on the
city and only kill the firstborn of those whose doorposts were not
marked. After the death of the Egyptians, Israel was set free from
their bondage. Constantine saw a vision and a sign in the
sky. He was told that he would conquer under this sign. Constantine
marked the shields of his soldiers with this sign, and he defeated
Maxentius in battle. It was Constantine, after this victory, that
would set the Christians free from the thread of persecution in the
Roman Empire. After the Israelites were set free from Egypt,
Pharaoh pursued them into the desert. Moses split the red
sea, and the Israelites passed through. Pharaoh followed, and when
his army was in the middle of the water, trapped, the sea
collapsed and Pharaoh and his army were drowned. Constantine came to Rome to besiege the city,
and defeat Maxentius. Standard military wisdom would
have told Maxentius to stay in the city and wait out the siege.
He chose to go out and meet Constantine at Milvian Bridge, over the
Tiber River. Maxentius got himself and his army trapped by the narrow
constraint of the bridge, and ended up drowning to death in the Tiber
river, along with a large part of his army.
Moses was a great prophet of the Israelites. He freed them from
bondage and led them towards the Promised Land. However, because
of his disobedience to God, he was told by God that he wouldn’t
enter the Promised Land. In order to get to the Promised Land, the
Israelites had to cross the Jordan River. Moses died
before the Israelites got to the Promised Land. Constantine was on his way to Persia. Along
the way, he planned on stopping at the Jordan river to be baptized.
However, he became very ill and couldn’t make the journey. He
turned back and was baptized by an Arian Bishop. Just like Moses,
he didn’t quite cross the finish line, since he was baptized an Arian.
He also, like Moses, didn’t make it to the Jordan river before he died.

Comments 1

  • Hello, my humble observation is that since Moses's parents were Jews, ad Gods convenant with Abraham was to circumcise their mae children within a week of birth, Moses could have been circumcised by his parents considering that he was nursed at home for three months before being put out to the river… Ave Maria!

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